Campus respond’s to Trump’s victory

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016, in Eau Claire, Wis. 

Julia Martinez, Sam Malone, and Madison Kacer

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump beat out Secretary Hillary Clinton with polls showing 279 electoral votes to her 228 electoral votes, according to the New York Times. Students reacted across campus to Trump’s victory following Election Day on Tuesday.

Republican students

Many Republican students on campus rejoiced after President-elect Donald Trump won the election Tuesday.

“I voted for Trump because I feel like all his sayings are very real, and I’m a very realistic person myself,” said freshman psychology major Joey Petersen. “I wanted to make sure that I chose a person that was very realistic.”

Prism

Alex Forgue, senior physics major and president of Prism, said a majority of Prism members are disappointed with the election results.

Prism is a student organization that provides a supportive and positive outlet for the LGBTQ communities at NIU.

“For anyone in Prism that has expressed their political views, they initially supported Bernie Sanders,” Forgue said. “Since then, we casted our vote for Clinton just to stop Donald Trump from becoming president.”

About 14 percent of LGBTQ community members voted for President-elect Donald Trump, according to a Tuesday LGBTQ Nation article.

“There are many reasons why I personally did not ever support Trump,” Forgue said. “Racism, sexism and his [open] support of violence are the main reasons, so the social and cultural issues concern me the most.”

Black Student Union

As election results for President-elect Donald Trump have come in, the Black Student Union has spoken up about a need for all students to unite and show love.

The union hosted an event Tuesday in the MLK Commons that members said called for love among all humans. Kendra Wilkinson, Black Student Union director of academics and education, said the organization is still trying to process the depth of the election results, but the first step is to unite students on campus.

“We haven’t had any talks with any other organizations on campus, but I can only hope that something of this magnitude [will inspire unity] and [students] know that we cannot get through this without each other,” Wilkinson said.

Wilkinson said Black Student Union board members don’t know what will happen going forward, but that they hope to combat the divisive language taking over.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump beat out Secretary Hillary Clinton with polls showing 279 electoral votes to her 228 electoral votes, according to the New York Times. Students reacted across campus to Trump’s victory following Election Day on Tuesday.

Latino Student Alliance

Latino Student Alliance members are disappointed in the election turn out but will continue to look toward a brighter future.

Roberto Flores, senior electrical engineering technology major and president of the Latino Student Alliance, said the group has not supported President-elect Donald Trump since he first announced his candidacy.

“Everybody dissed Trump when he first announced his candidacy because they thought it was a joke,” Flores said. “Then as Trump kept getting more attention, we realized we didn’t want to support someone who was saying disrespectful things toward minorities and others.”

Trump received 29 percent of the Latino vote while the Latino vote counts toward 11 percent of the popular vote, according to a Wednesday USA Today College article.

“When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best,” Trump said during his real estate mogul presidential announcement speech on June 16, 2015. “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.”

Flores said those close to him are frightened because of the election results, but he knows he must still have faith in America.