Egyptian Theatre to screen ‘Gone with the Wind’ on 35MM

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The Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second Street

Jacob Baker, Lifestyle Editor

DeKALB – The classic film “Gone with the Wind” will be shown at the Egyptian Theatre at 2 p.m. April 11 on 35MM as a part of their classic film series with guest speaker Joe Flynn, associate director for academic affairs at the Center for Black Studies. 

Seating at the theatre, 135 N. 2nd Street, will be limited and spread out, according to the Egyptian Theatre news release. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for students, with proof of student ID, and seniors at the Egyptian Theatre website or at the box office by calling 815-758-1225.

Flynn will be introducing the film to discuss the historical context when the film was released in 1939. 

“‘Gone with the Wind’ was a part of a long line of Hollywood films that featured African American characters and actors in very stereotypical and often one-dimensional ways,” Flynn said. 

The film is also a celebration of the work of Hattie McDaniel and Butterfly McQueen, who are the primary Black characters in the film, and their importance within film history and especially for Black actors in film, Flynn said. 

“Gone with the Wind” saw the first Black actor, Hattie McDaniel, win an Academy award for her role in the film. While it’s important to celebrate those achievements, the goal of showing “Gone with the Wind” was to put the film into context to discuss and understand its problematic themes, said Jeanine Holcomb, Marketing and Communications Director of the Egyptian Theatre.

“We want viewers to have the appreciation of a classic film, but also look through the film of the lens of 2021 and understand it isn’t an historically accurate depiction,” Holcomb said. 

Some of the greatest films to come out of Hollywood that pushed filmmaking boundaries were highly racist, like “Birth of a Nation,” Flynn said. These films didn’t give an accurate representation of the brutalities within slavery. 

Viewers have a special opportunity to view “Gone with the Wind” on 35MM film that was used in the 1930s. 

“It’s really cool to have this equipment that was used in the 30’s here in our theatre,” Holcomb said. “That just adds another level of history and fun to it that just make it special.” 

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit the Egyptian Theatre website.