Egyptian Theatre to host ‘Elf’ the musical

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Egyptian theatre wishes DeKalb a happy holiday.

By Ariel Morris , Lifestyle reporter

DeKALB – DeKalb’s Egyptian Theatre, 135 N 2nd St., presents the musical “Elf” this December in collaboration with community theater Stage Coach Players. The musical is based on the 2003 movie “Elf” starring Will Ferrell as Buddy who embarks on a journey to find his real father, and after doing so, their relationship takes an unexpected turn. 

This holiday musical plays Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 18 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be found on the Egyptian Theatre and Stage Coach Players websites.

The Egyptian Theatre and Stage Coach Players have collaborated on numerous productions over the years prior to COVID-19, said Jeanine Holcomb, marketing and communications director for the Egyptian Theatre.

“Recently, we had them in Spring 2019 for their musical, ‘The Little Mermaid.’ After that show we wanted them to do another musical here, but then COVID-19 happened in the mix. Once the summer was looking good, they happened to have a show for the fall. We were able to work with each other’s board directors to bring an awesome family holiday show to our stage,” Holcomb said.

Although the Egyptian Theatre doesn’t present holiday plays every year, fans can still support their free film screenings of movies like “It’s a Wonderful Life.” They also collaborate with other organizations like Beth Fowler’s School of Dance to host  productions  like “The Nutcracker.” Some of these productions are hosted yearly, though each year may present different holiday performances.  

Fans have so much to look forward to in “Elf.” Stage Coach Players and the Egyptian Theatre have worked hard to create a similarity to the film while adding a slight twist to make it more fun.

“When I talked to the show’s director, Jane (Kuntz), she informed me that so many people have certain lines in that movie or just different jokes that you’re attached to, and there’s a lot of carry over from the film to the live production,” Holcomb said.